Tag Archive | educational outcomes

The LSU Top 5 #58

This is the 58th of our top 5 bits and pieces about education from around the internet. (Linking doesn’t mean we necessarily agree with these articles!) How Academia Resembles a Drug Gang – Alexandre Afonso The title stands alone on this one! Link Pets in the academic workplace – Times Higher Education If the purpose of […]

The LSU Top 5 #54

This is the 54th of our top 5 bits and pieces about education from around the internet.

(Linking doesn’t mean we necessarily agree with these articles!)

Are You Competent? Prove It: Degrees Based on What You Can Do, Not How Long You WentNY Times

This article looks at a new (renewed?) push for competency- rather than time-based degrees. That is, instead of requiring students to attend class for a semester before taking a test, students can instead learn at their own pace and, when they’re ready, demonstrate that have mastered the required outcomes/competencies.

The Lumina Foundation has been one of the champions of the approach. Jamie P. Merisotis, president and chief executive, says the rationale is not just lower cost but better education. “The time-centered system says if you take the coursework, get passing grades and meet our academic standards, you get the degree,” he said. “Competency is a student-centered, learning-outcome-based model. Where you get the education is secondary to what you know and are able to do.”

Others are less in favour of the changes:

“It’s a red flag to me, the idea that this is going to be more personalized, more flexible, more accountable to the consumer,” [Amy E. Slaton, a professor of history at Drexel University,] says. “If you are from a lower socioeconomic status, you have this new option that appears to cost less than a traditional bachelor’s degree, but it’s not the same product. I see it as a really diminished higher education experience for less money, and yet disguised as this notion of greater access.”

Still room for learning skills, then!

Link

South Korea’s education system: The great decompression – The Economist

South Korean students dream of being recruited by one of the few big firms, called chaebol, that drive their country’s economic development. With competition so intense, preparation is pushed back even into early childhood education. There are high costs for this phenomenon, such as great psychological strain on the youngsters and a low birth rate due to the expense of education. A few solutions are suggested in the article.  

Link

Vietnam levies cash fine on exam cheatersTuoi Tre News

The Vietnamese government has just issued a decree to allow for fines of up to 20 million VND for breaking education rules, such as cheating, sitting exams for others, abusing students or hiring under-qualified teachers. 

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When College Students Have an Audience, Does Their Writing Improve?Ed Tech Magazine

This article looks at how giving students an audience – a real one, not a hypothetical one – can improve their writing and learning. The author interviews an English professor on what has and hasn’t worked for her in finding this audience for her students.

Link

Educators doubt int’l joint programs using Vietnamese translationTuoi Tre News

Educators warned students about the quality of international joint masters and doctoral programmes because of their easy entrance requirements – both for students’ academic and English backgrounds. Even non-English speaking students can gain admission to such programs offered through partnerships between Vietnamese and foreign universities, with students allowed to hire translators and complete thesis defences in Vietnamese.

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Bonus #6!

7 Awkward Places You Could Be Meeting With Your Professor This SemesterBuzzfeed

You like gifs, don’t you? Because all the answers are animated.

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We love hearing your thoughts on these articles, so feel free to comment below!

 

 

The LSU Top 5 #39

This is the 39th of our weekly links to the top 5 bits and pieces we’ve found from around the internet. (Linking doesn’t mean we necessarily agree with these articles!) Why I’m hiring graduates with thirds this year – The Spectator To make an employer look at your CV, get a third-class degree first! Well…maybe […]

Rote Learning: the best of a bad lot?

By Sam Graham and Truong Thuy Van, LSU Rote learning has a bad name in the West. Sure, we need to memorise things. An immediate grasp of times tables, for example, is useful. We also need a foundation of knowledge before we can do any serious thinking. However, encouraging rote learning or memorisation for it’s […]

Your turn: Is it all about jobs?

By David DeBrot, LSU My son is 7 years old and in Grade 1. His last field trip was to a local kid’s ‘edutainment’ facility entirely themed on occupations and getting them to think about what job they’d like to perform in the future. I felt frustrated – ‘Isn’t 7 a little too early to […]

Do you see what I see?

By Carol Witney, LSU As an international educator, I have often come across very bright, articulate, lively and energetic students  who are really struggling with literacy skills in English. In the UK with a native speaker, it would be natural for me to ask a few questions to try and determine whether the learner has […]

Teamwork Asian style

By Dr. Wei Wei, LSU This is Wei’s article that appeared in Thanh Nien News and Vietweek News on 01/02/2013. I have never believed that the idea of “teamwork” can work in the Asian context. I can still vaguely remember the first time I did teamwork with 3 colleagues from Asia in the student common room of the School […]

It is OK to be confused

By Sam Graham, LSU This is Sam’s article that appeared in Thanh Nien News and Vietweek News on 7/12/2012. University can be a scary place. There are constant deadlines and never any time to rest and apply what you have already learned. Each class brings new subject material or a new assignment, always pushing the boundaries of knowledge. New ideas […]

An alternative education

By Sam Graham, LSU My most profound learning was experience was not in a university classroom. Instead, I was sitting eyes closed, with little sense of the passing time, in pain. There were no concrete outcomes from the course and nothing keeping me there. The teacher’s eyes were closed too. This was a Vipassana meditation […]

What is the point of an education?

This is Sam’s article that appeared in Thanh Nien News and Vietweek on 1/6/2012. By Sam Graham, LSU I have a job offer for you. It is a really good one with some nice perks. You get to read all sorts of books and spend hours each week debating with your co-workers. Productivity is optional, so long as […]

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