Tag Archive | learning in Vietnam

The LSU Top 5 #56

This is the 56th of our top 5 bits and pieces about education from around the internet. (Linking doesn’t mean we necessarily agree with these articles!) The King of MOOCs Abdicates the Throne – Slate It seems the hype over massive open online courses is being tempered. Two years ago, he was predicting that MOOCs […]

The LSU Top 5 #56

  This is the 56th of our top 5 bits and pieces about education from around the internet. (Linking doesn’t mean we necessarily agree with these articles!) Typography Book Explores What It Feels Like To Have Dyslexia – Huffington Post Noticing that dyslexia education seemed entirely focused on helping dyslexics to read better, Sam Barclay […]

The LSU Top 5 #52

52! A year! Or it would be if we hadn’t missed a week, so it’s a year and a week of our top 5 bits and pieces about education from around the internet.

(Linking doesn’t mean we necessarily agree with these articles!)

Asia’s parents suffering ‘education fever’BBC News

You can have too much of a good thing. This article covers the ways in which parents are perhaps putting too much pressure on students in a lot of Asian countries.

“It is not easy to dampen education fever. In South Korea as in other East Asian countries, “it is deeply embedded in the culture. It’s also based on reality that there is no alternative pathway to success or a good career other than a prestige degree, this was true 50 years ago, and it’s just as true today”.

“As long as that’s the case it’s actually rational for parents to spend so much and put so much pressure on their children,” said Prof Seth.

Link

Three years of exams

This picture shows how many exams a Chinese student took in three years of high school.

http://i.imgur.com/njulvZq.jpg

If your Chinese is up to scratch, there’s a TV piece to go with it (link).

Link

TMI From ProfessorsInside Higher Ed

Professors are sometimes advised to connect with their students to make them engaged in classes by telling self-deprecating jokes or sharing life stories. However, a recent study suggested that there should be limits to this teaching approach, with such informality reducing the perceived credibility of the teacher, leading to student behaviour that is less conducive to learning.

Link

Students for hire in Vietnamese schoolsDan Tri International

Too busy to go to class, but want a degree? Pay someone 100,000VND (US$4.80) or less and they’ll pass you the notes.

Nguyen Hong Hanh, who works in the media sector, said, “I’m busy with work during the daytime and then my kids at night, yet I still need time to study for a second degree, so I need some help. I pay VND80,000 per class and additional fees for phone calls and lunches. I only come to class to take tests.”

Check out some requests and offers (in Vietnamese) for ‘class attending services’ on Facebook (link).

Link

Beyond learning stylesThe Brilliant Report

The idea of learning styles isn’t as fashionable as it once was, having been quite thoroughly debunked.

While students do have preferences about how they learn, the evidence shows they absorb information just as well whether or not they encounter it in their preferred mode…All learners benefit when information is put forth in diverse ways that engage a multitude of the senses.  

This isn’t to say that things shouldn’t be mixed up a bit. The author encourages teachers to focus on the ‘universal learning style of the human mind’, where novelty and different learning approaches help everyone. She also suggests that teachers focus more on whether students are surface, strategic or deep learners rather than look at the traditional distinction of kinaesthetic, auditory or visual.

Link

We love hearing your thoughts on these articles, so feel free to comment below!

 

The LSU Top 5 #48

This is the 48th of our weekly links to the top 5 bits and pieces we’ve found from around the internet. (Linking doesn’t mean we necessarily agree with these articles!) Colleges’ Role Shouldn’t End at Graduation – The Chronicle of Higher Education With the transition from university to the workforce longer and often more complex […]

The LSU Top 5 #46

This is the 46th of our weekly links to the top 5 bits and pieces we’ve found from around the internet. (Linking doesn’t mean we necessarily agree with these articles!) Silence as a pedagogical tool – Times Higher Education Silence can be used to encourage student contemplation and a “democratic” classroom. I have conducted my […]

The LSU Top 5 #45

This is the 45th of our weekly links to the top 5 bits and pieces we’ve found from around the internet. (Linking doesn’t mean we necessarily agree with these articles!) Students’ use of laptops in class lowers grades: Canadian study – The Globe and Mail Using a laptop to take notes, or even sitting near […]

The LSU Top 5 #42

This is the 42nd of our weekly links to the top 5 bits and pieces we’ve found from around the internet. (Linking doesn’t mean we necessarily agree with these articles!) Living in silos: Blindness, elephants and higher ed customer service – InsideTimsHead This piece calls for a de-siloing of universities, with departments and units being […]

Rote Learning: the best of a bad lot?

By Sam Graham and Truong Thuy Van, LSU Rote learning has a bad name in the West. Sure, we need to memorise things. An immediate grasp of times tables, for example, is useful. We also need a foundation of knowledge before we can do any serious thinking. However, encouraging rote learning or memorisation for it’s […]

The LSU Top 5 #37

This is the 37th of our weekly links to the top 5 bits and pieces we’ve found from around the internet. (Linking doesn’t mean we necessarily agree with these articles!) Students practice reading at preparatory class for university entrance exams – Vietnam Net Bridge This article reports on a class in Hanoi that had around […]

The LSU Top 5 #35

This is the 35th of our weekly links to the top 5 bits and pieces we’ve found from around the internet. (Linking doesn’t mean we necessarily agree with these articles!)   Can I Use the Same Paper for Multiple College Courses? – The New York Times, The Ethicist   The reader asks whether submitting the same essay […]

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