Tag Archive | transnational universities

The LSU Top 5 #54

This is the 54th of our top 5 bits and pieces about education from around the internet.

(Linking doesn’t mean we necessarily agree with these articles!)

Are You Competent? Prove It: Degrees Based on What You Can Do, Not How Long You WentNY Times

This article looks at a new (renewed?) push for competency- rather than time-based degrees. That is, instead of requiring students to attend class for a semester before taking a test, students can instead learn at their own pace and, when they’re ready, demonstrate that have mastered the required outcomes/competencies.

The Lumina Foundation has been one of the champions of the approach. Jamie P. Merisotis, president and chief executive, says the rationale is not just lower cost but better education. “The time-centered system says if you take the coursework, get passing grades and meet our academic standards, you get the degree,” he said. “Competency is a student-centered, learning-outcome-based model. Where you get the education is secondary to what you know and are able to do.”

Others are less in favour of the changes:

“It’s a red flag to me, the idea that this is going to be more personalized, more flexible, more accountable to the consumer,” [Amy E. Slaton, a professor of history at Drexel University,] says. “If you are from a lower socioeconomic status, you have this new option that appears to cost less than a traditional bachelor’s degree, but it’s not the same product. I see it as a really diminished higher education experience for less money, and yet disguised as this notion of greater access.”

Still room for learning skills, then!

Link

South Korea’s education system: The great decompression – The Economist

South Korean students dream of being recruited by one of the few big firms, called chaebol, that drive their country’s economic development. With competition so intense, preparation is pushed back even into early childhood education. There are high costs for this phenomenon, such as great psychological strain on the youngsters and a low birth rate due to the expense of education. A few solutions are suggested in the article.  

Link

Vietnam levies cash fine on exam cheatersTuoi Tre News

The Vietnamese government has just issued a decree to allow for fines of up to 20 million VND for breaking education rules, such as cheating, sitting exams for others, abusing students or hiring under-qualified teachers. 

Link 
When College Students Have an Audience, Does Their Writing Improve?Ed Tech Magazine

This article looks at how giving students an audience – a real one, not a hypothetical one – can improve their writing and learning. The author interviews an English professor on what has and hasn’t worked for her in finding this audience for her students.

Link

Educators doubt int’l joint programs using Vietnamese translationTuoi Tre News

Educators warned students about the quality of international joint masters and doctoral programmes because of their easy entrance requirements – both for students’ academic and English backgrounds. Even non-English speaking students can gain admission to such programs offered through partnerships between Vietnamese and foreign universities, with students allowed to hire translators and complete thesis defences in Vietnamese.

Link

Bonus #6!

7 Awkward Places You Could Be Meeting With Your Professor This SemesterBuzzfeed

You like gifs, don’t you? Because all the answers are animated.

Link

We love hearing your thoughts on these articles, so feel free to comment below!

 

 

Critical Thinking Study Part 2

By Matthew Cowan As promised in last week’s post, this week we’re posting an infographic on the next stage of our critical thinking study. This particular infographic was on display at our event a few weeks ago. If the infographic needs further elaboration, don’t hesitate to leave a comment! Part 2

The LSU Top 5 #17

This is the seventeenth of our weekly links to the top 5 interesting bits and pieces we’ve found from around the internet. (Linking doesn’t mean we necessarily agree with these articles!) A New World - Times Higher Education Amidst dramatic economic and demographic change, the author explores the top five trends driving major and lasting changes in Higher […]

Teamwork Asian style

By Dr. Wei Wei, LSU This is Wei’s article that appeared in Thanh Nien News and Vietweek News on 01/02/2013. I have never believed that the idea of “teamwork” can work in the Asian context. I can still vaguely remember the first time I did teamwork with 3 colleagues from Asia in the student common room of the School […]

The LSU Top 5 #7

This is the seventh of our weekly Top 5 links to the most interesting bits and pieces we’ve found from around the internet. (Linking doesn’t mean we necessarily agree with these articles!) Business Education: Would the economy be better off without MBA students? - The Economist MBAs, yea or nay? The Economist is hosting a debate, starting yesterday, and you can […]

Hear from the graduates

Dang with some of the LSU staff  (from left) - Dy, Wei, Matt and David

By David DeBrot, LSU with Nguyen Quoc Hung and Nguyen Hong Hai Dang It’s Graduation this weekend both in Saigon and Hanoi at RMIT Vietnam. Listen to two of the top graduates and former SLAMs mentors talk about their university experience  and their advice to students and staff at this university and others. The two […]

Do you say ‘I do’?

By Moulik Zaveri, PhD Moulik has a PhD in Marketing from RMIT University, Australia and has been a marketing lecturer at RMIT Vietnam since 2010. He’s about to embark on his next big undertaking – marriage!  If you are reading this page it is very likely that you are either pursuing a PhD or planning […]

What is normal anyway? Supporting equality and diversity

By Ksenia Nikolaeva, Nguyen Tuan Tu and Carol Witney Ksenia Nikolaeva is an alumnus of RMIT International University Vietnam and a PhD candidate in Computational Biology and Innovation. Nguyen Tuan Tu is a student  in the Bachelor of Business Information Systems program at RMIT Vietnam. Carol Witney is a Learning Advisor in the LSU. Ksenia […]

Reflecting (on) microaggression

By Ian Handsley Ian lives in a small Japanese fishing village with his wife and 4 kids. Just enjoying a spot of house husbandry at the moment, but will be back at the higher-education coal face soon. Higher Education Innovationist and former member of the LSU. I stop passersby in their tracks. I attract the stares […]

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